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done them from darn near a century. these don't look so bad. like it or not, the majority of americans believe that global warming is an issue. we need to develop clear energy sources. fossil fuels may be a difficult problem. we are subsidizing thingings. it is cheaper to produce energy from natural gas. it is a subsidies. other than it is natural gas there. it is 63 cents compared to $53. that is not a pay off to me. >> i will have to disagree with rick. last time wind energy had any impact was in the century. we have moved in oil and natural gas. but let's get rid of subsidies and let them sink or swim. wind energy will sink and we'll be better off. it is behathe sector we'll pour billions into it >> the wind farms are kind of methadone clinic. we'll reenact the two percent . part of the bargain let's get america off of a far more dangerous drug than corn or ethanoyl. it hurts food shoppers and tears up the inside of the engine. >> two wrongs don't make a right. what john was referring to was windmills in places like norway. >> and holland. >> and what is happening the wind sector to
are now the norm. >> you don't think you're working too much? >> no. >> do you? >> no. >> do you? >> no. >> you're brainwashed. [laughter] >> maybe we're all crazy. >> maybe we are. [clock ticking] >> we have eight weeks of vacation. >> eight weeks of vacation? >> eight weeks, yes. >> like most frenchmen, marchand has no guilt about taking so much time off. in fact, it's the law. full-time workers in france are guaranteed at least five weeks vacation and a maximum 35-hour work week, with no paid overtime allowed. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. >> the aim is to keep your job without working. >> welcome to 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm leslie stahl. in this episode, we'll examine our relationship with work. how much is too much, too little, and who should decide? but before we look at the hours we spend on the job, we'll look at how employers tried to influence the way their workers act off the job. as morley safer reported in 2005, that cigarette or drink at home, that political candidate you supported, even your eating habits are coming under the scrutiny of your em
not be better in the morning, you don't know. consider that it will be. the first and the last were optimism. it all deals with creating an image of confidence with an organization. you can do anything or we're great. you don't believe it? let's make it happen. >> people talk about how america is in certain collapse. any time you go to europe, i love europe. i'm not going to talk about the chocolate makers, but when you go to europe and especially great britain, you don't get the sense of optimism you don't get when you land back here in america. i heard you talk about the force multiplier. you multiply that 300 million times over, what a powerful force. >> i spend a lot of time out in the countryside talking to all kinds of audiences. trade associations and financial organizations and they are all worried about the economy and the unemployment rate. they haven't lost confidence. they are hustling and trying to make a living so that people make a better living for their families. don't count this place out. it will never be out. >> the second rule runs counter to what the reality is in washi
of over 150,000 american men and women in my hands. i don't want to make a mistake. i'm human, and i recognize that i might. and i worry about that. regardless of the outcome, if when this whole thing is over i can say to myself, you gave it your best shot, then that's got to be enough. >> good morning. it's he friday, december 28th. on set with us the co-host of "sfreet signs" is brian sullivan who just showed up here. president of the national action network is rev raend al sharpton and fortune editor lee gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to fi
somewhere in the middle of where both parties stand. and we also know that if we don't act, 100% of the american people are going to start feeling an impact of higher taxes. i honestly don't worry about the millionaires and billionaires at all. i don't worry about the people who are fine, who don't even really know or care that much about a tax hike that takes them back to the clinton years when they did very well. i don't worry about those folks. i worry about the folks in the middle. and there are always arguments about what is that line? and some say the middle class is at $75,000, some say $150,000, some even go higher because there are states like my state that are very high cost-of-living states. but we know, if we're going to get a deal, we're going to have to meet somewhere in the middle. to me, if we fail, it will be a very, very sad moment in history. and i hear a lot of talk about the sequester. well, mr. president, i don't know exactly how you voted, but i want to say that i voted for a sequester, if we couldn't find savings as part of a debt limit deal. and i'm not
not for this hit. can i tell you some things going on behind me today? >> no, don't have time, sorry. that's the way it is. >> i was going to tell you about the drunken revellers and their bathroom experiences, i guess you don't want to know. stuart: you should hear what they're saying, no more drunken revellers, no time. wrap up, keep warm, young lady, i mean it. >> thank you very much happy new year to you. stuart: happy new year to you, lauren. and on thursday, president obama signed an executive order that ends a pay freeze for congress and federal workers that is. as our march this coming here, federal employees will see 1/2% to 1% pay increase and get this, 535 members of congress will also get a raise. so, federal workers, 2 million of them already earn more than the rest of us, they get more. and congress, totally failing to do its job, will also get a raise. about 900 bucks each. do they deserve it? according to the latest rasmussen poll you say, oh, no, scott rasmussen joins us now. all right, scott, i've seen the numbers, 5% think that congress is doing a good or excellent job.
don't remember his name. the fact the could not remember what departments or in the government is a little forgivable. i did it for the same reason, in many respects. i wanted to deal with something i like, that i thought was worth pursuing. a long time ago i did a book called "the emerging republican majority.: it pretty much did emerge. i thought i would take the methodology that i used in the book to try to, with a good explanation, a realignment of 1775. that is a good part of what this new book is about. >> before we get into this, would you deal with one comment that i saw on the web written by weisburg a number of years ago. he called you a liberal. >> i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party for a long time there was a major progressive movements. but, liberal, i don't think so. outsider, antiestablishment, but not liberal and not merely conservative either. i would not accept either of those labels. i understand it does not stop with those labels. in terms of the politic
now with don lemon. hey, don. . >> thank you very much. brooke is off today. a winter storm hammering the northeast with snow, sleet, and high winds after it barbed the south and spawned tornados and more misery. one of the tornados caught on camera. a walgreens in mobile, alabama, a tornado just churned through and josh holman was there when it happened. listen. >> i never have been in a war zone, but i'm sure this is what it looks like. all the stuff that is lifted off the buildings here. there were totes and things left in the trees. i was thankful i was alive. >> taken to carthy airport, a southwest airlines plane with 134 passengers skidded off the runway and luckily no one was hurt. as the snow piles up, thousands of travelers are stranded as flights are canceled and the kids out in the snow seem to be enjoying all of this. we will look at how people are coping and what else is in store. chad? >> wind for the big cities, don. it is going to be just one of the days where the planes can't get out of the way of each other. we will have airport delays at la guardia and jfk and nuke.
we don't have closure . we thought it was looking early morning as senator lindsay graham was up . he said the president won. here is senator graham. >> people don't want to go over the cliff. i think what have we accomplished. a political victory to the president. hats off to the president. he will get tax rate increases on upper income americans. we have accomplished very little about becoming greece or getting out of debt. it is a political victory of the president. i hope we have courage when it comes to the debt ceiling. to fight as what we want as republicans. >> there was a lot of celebration but not anything to do with a deal being made. when house peeker john bone bone came in. republicans gave him a standing ovation . but there is no decision made. >> to chris wallace's name those who talk don't know . those who know don't talk. >> dave: some talk. republicans have made a significant compromise from what i can tell you. republicans have offered $400,000 thres hold for individuals and $550,000 for couples. that is a significant compromise for the republican ideology that did
us your own views on liberal conservatives now. i was always a bit more of a populist. i don't think i have ever been what i would call a liberal. somebody might call me a progressive. certainly even within the republican party. outsider, and antiestablishmentarian. >> what did you think of richard nixon when you worked with him? >> i liked him better after i wasn't working with him and he was out of the presidency. he is a very intelligent man, a man with enormous personal problems in terms of relating to people. and i understand much better, which i did not a time when i worked for him, how he was not an effective administrator and how he couldn't keep all those worms in the can, whether you are talking about the administration or especially watergate. >> how did you keep up with him after the years that he was president? >> he read one of my books from the early 1980's that he liked. somehow, we started having correspondence again. i would see him max four times a year. his office was up in new york and then in saddle river, new jersey. so when i would go from washington to our ho
not going to read this because i don't know where those places are. and generally did not have to go to a map much. i did research the way i have always done it, pretty much of myself. bring it all myself and having it there. basically thinking it out or not thinking out, off by myself. >> which character in the 1775 book, both british and american, was the most interesting to you? >> actually, a lot more interesting. if you think interesting in were thesignificant important impression, george washington was probably people think of him as, enormously impressive in a lot of ways. he was very careful in what he did to crate that image. -- to create that image. he made a number of mistakes. the rest of the time, he was very good. sam adams, i have enormous respect for him. he burned a lot of records that might have told us more about him. but i think he seemed a lot of things brilliantly. i think, for example, he knew what happened at lexington and concord before anyone. sam adams schemed all kinds of things out brilliantly. it would take me a documentary and a series of four books to
republicans hard at this event he was making clear if they don't have the final deal, he will go out on the road and pound them in the days ahead to put the blame on them. the second thing he was doing, not just on the fiscal cliff. on immigration and other irks in the days ahead -- issues in the day ahead. he is going to take it to the american people on issue after issue, break. >> bret: we'll head back for anything breaking. thanks. stocks started the week up, encouraged about talk of a deal. dow finished up. the nasdaq gained 59. senate homeland security committee released a report today blasting the state department for failures leading to the deadly september 11 attack on the u.s. mission in libya. this come on the heels of a scathing report by independent state department accountability review board. chief intelligence correspondent has the story. >> senate report falls to president obama for inconsistent statement whether the benghazi assault was a terrorist attack given intelligence showed in hour that the al-qaeda affiliate was responsible on september 11. as evidence, the
scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't matter that much. that the leader of any organization faces external constraint. if you are a ceo of a company you have a competitor. you can't set your price at whatever you want. they are constraints and all the things that happen inside a country or company or military unit. you can't do whatever you want. maybe most importantly leaders are a chosen randomly. most leader of powerful organization that we care that have the ability to reshape history. they're not picked out of a hat. they're pick the abuse the organization is looking for someone with some set of characteristic. >> the leadership process. >> i think every organizer should have a process. very few organizations are going to pick people randomly. it include company or countries. if you look in the the right way the scientist which aren't an organization at all. countries where if we look at the most recent presidential election in the united states. there were people people saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops off and michele bachmann drops off and
: well, listen, thank you. this is a fascinating books. alexis totino, the toes he says he don't know about it. >> guest: thank you very much. the fact that was, but tv signature programs in which authors are interviewed by policymakers, legislators and others familiar with their material. "after words" errors at 10:00 p.m. on saturday, 12:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on monday. you can also watch "after words" online. go to booktv.org and click on the booktv series and topics list on the upper right side of the page. >> historian harlow giles unger recounts the life of the six president, john quincy adams who died in 1840. quincy adams, second president had a long career, which aside from his presidency 10 years as secretary of state, senator, congressman administered six countries. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i will start with a fairly simple question. was very moment when he said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed there was. it took place a couple years ago when i ran out of ideas for any more books on the fo
that you don't really need, you're not going to get. >> it will probably affect my finances in a huge way. >> it will affect my dad. my dad's 76 and he's already got his food stamps cut and his medicaid cut. i don't know how much more than can cut. >> half of all americans now expect no deal by new year's day. by a margin of 2-1 they hold the republicans more at fault than obama and his fellow democrats. >> earlier, i spoke to richard at campaign's for america's future that's a progressive political organization. he says it's unlikely that the u.s. will meet the deadline. >> it looks extremely unlikely at this point. they're not returning to the lower house until the day before the deadline. so chances are there won't be a deal before january 1st. but then most of the provisions of this so-calleded fiscal cliff won't have an immediate impact. several will but most will be delayed. so thile still have a chance to work in january. >> how is it going to be delayed? because delay has been something that president obama and the democrats have rejected. >> the tax laws won't have an impact on p
an hour too late to my wife shaking me. >> juliet: i don't know what it is about this morning. i'm like in lala land. >> clayton: there is no snow. >> juliet: there's no snow here, sir. >> clayton: it might be be the pending fiscal cliff. >> juliet: that's exactly what it is. >> clayton: honestly if you read the different newspaper reports what in the world is going on with the fiscal cliff, you hear about a small deal sort of in the works between harry reid and mitch mcconnell, maybe it's not voted on until monday, maybe no deal at all. maybe sequestration is going to happen so for that let's go to washington. >> juliet: all right. tick-tock, tick-tock, time is almost up for lawmakers as we say to avert the fiscal cliff. they worked throughout the weekend in hopes of hammering out some sort of deal. >> dave: peter doocy is live in washington and we hustle you over to the capitol. and what is the latest, do you think we'll get something done? >> reporter: dave, we were told late in the evening that legislative staff was going to work through the night, but the only principal we heard fr
government securities and investments in the federal employee pension funds. those don't sound like good practices going forward. president obama meanwhile arrives back in washington after cutting short his christmas vacation in hawaii. congress is back in town, but little progress was made over the holiday to avoid the fiscal cliff and no talks have been set. the senate is due in session today, but the house has no plans to reconvene. last week, house speaker john boehner said it was up to the house to act on extending unemployment benefits. as we work through all of this, we are happy to be joined by allen capper, head of credit strategy at lloyd's for the hour. welcome back. i guess we're still shaking off the christmas turkey tryptophan, i guess they call it, and yet it feels as though it's groundhog's day. >> yes. you say shaking off the christmas blues and we're shaking still waiting to hear what happened with this fiscal cliff. we knew they would take it to the wire. there's no surprises. what concerns me, this may stretch on until january. now, this is not the first time we've be
have assets and produces a look and the disadvantages for people who don't. when you can compare your own opportunities to those two have already had a good ones and have accumulated something, you understand even if you don't go through the mathematics that the system tends to produce inequalities of not come. the best example would be a last 30 years, a stunning time in which the gap between rich and poor has become much more extreme in the united states that it was 30 years ago. if you compared 30 years ago here as opposed to the countries of western europe, we were the most egalitarian of countries. now we are the least. we have outstripped everybody else because our capitalism has been a relatively robust. when capitalism can do it's thing, it polarizes. when it polarizes it creates an awareness that is probably also occur to you. if a growing number of people i'm having a hard time and a shrinking number of people are collecting enormous wealth, it will occur to the two of them that this is happening. and in the one group there may develop their resentment against the of a group
of reporting through the years. i don't want to do a quickie. i don't write my books for the politics of the moment. >> host: the book ends in 1989. but at this point, barack obama, so far lived in seattle and 1962 until 1967, back to honolulu and then back to indonesia. 1967 to 1971, back to honolulu, 79 to 1981, los angeles and then he moved to new york for columbia come he lived there for years, 1981 until 1985. in chicago for the first time in 1985 until 1989. then off to harvard law school. two more pieces of the book i would like to ask you about. we want to tie the story together. now we are in 1989. where is his father? >> his father died in 1982 in a car accident driving home drunk from a makeshift bar area -- when we were in nairobi, we saw the streets in the area where this took place in it was almost sadly inevitable. >> host: are his grandparents and mothers alive at this point? >> guest: yes, all three are alive. his mother died right before his book comes out. >> host: "dreams from my father" >> guest: yes, "dreams from my father." so she never got to see his political
a number of years in the building. if sam raburn is not a reflection of that, i don't know who is. >> how about presidents under which you have served? >> ronald reagan. i had the honor of serving with him and he signed air quality district act for southern california. the first preschool program in the country was signed by ronald reagan. people hardly believed that but he was willing to use government in a way that was responsive to real challenged that government should be dealing with. i was proud that we had a chance to work together in connection with some of that. >> if you look across, it's a lot of history, 34 years altogether, is there a time when you look back and say those are the best years. those are the ones i enjoyed the most. >> every year that goes by it amazes me that i am still here. i did not plan to be here this long. if i did not have the chance to serve in some of those appropriations we would not have stayed this long. between now and then, there is little chance -- there are many ways to impact the process and the future of congress itself. it is my intention to
will happen if they don't. >>> we begin with today's "y opener," your world in 90 seconds. >>> hillary clinton will be celebrating the new year from a hospital bed. >> secretary of state hillary clinton is hospitalized in new york city. >> she's got a blood clot she suffered from a fall. >> it left her severely dehydrat dehydrated. clinton had been planning to return to work this week. >> there's still significant difference between the two sides. >> today the final day of fiscal cliff negotiations. >> i want everybody know i'm willing to get this done but i need a dance partner. >>> vice president joe biden is now in on negotiations. >> do i wish things were more order will i in washington? absolutely. >>> a tour bus crashed on an icy oregon highway has killed nine people and injured 20 others. >> today is december 231st. there's going to be a huge celebration in times square with everyone waiting for the crystal ball to drop. >>> new video surfacing from the fate tall plaep crash in russia. sending debris into oncoming traffic. >>> a scary slip on a frozen lake ban an effort to save a life.
p panache? >> my hair looked different on every single -- i don't know. >> do you have a different style and mood every morning? >> i don't know. it shows that it's real. that's what i'm going to stick with. all right. >> we want to thank john harwood for joining us for the hour. we also want to thank tony and jared for being with us through this whole hour. >> and sitting through that. >> happy new year to everybody. and we should point out, look, fiscal cliff, market says, what, me worry at this point? >> i wonder what really did happen. did you get anything -- >> i think it was tony and i. >> not since we last talked. >> you guys get along well. as long as you're a steeler fan, you get along. it was great. thanks, guys. we've got to go. >> can you see this? we're giving out the fiscal cliff bars today. >> bye, everybody. happy new year, joe. right now, time for "squawk on the street." ♪ >> one final trading session for 2012. and it comes, of course, with the add eed drama of a fiscal cliff set to take place 15 hours from now. i'm carl, with melissa lee. cramer and faber are of
the past few weeks is they don't have a plan of their own that could get bipartisan support. the so-called senate bill that the majority leader keeps referring to passed with only democratic votes and despite his repeated calls for the house to call it, he knows he himself is the reason it can't happen. the paperwork never left the senate. so there's nothing for the house to vote on. as i pointed out before we took that vote back on july 25th, the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside f
right now. that is earl bloom men our from oregon. we don't have at chamber. we don't know how much are actually there. sometimes it is only, you know, the guy who is talking. but, nevertheless as mike pointed out they have passed several different measures, one way back in may to tackle ernestly the budget deficit and debt and then a more recent one that passes an extension of all the bush tax cuts. so the their position right now, at least speaker boehner's is, hey, it is time for the senate to act on some of our bills. we'll keep an eye what is happening there. heather: busy day for them. president obama taking his case to the american public. here is what he had to say about the situation playing out on capitol hill. >> what's been holding us back is the dysfunction here in washington and if, you know, people start to see that on january 1st this problem still hasn't been solved, that we haven't seen the deficit reduction we could have had, the republicans been willing to take the deal i gave them, if they say, that people's taxes have gone up, which means consumer spending is g
and they don't put it in perspective. how much are we talking about in terms of revenue. as a share of the revenue we're going to raise over the next ten years. how much are we talking about saving in these accounts in relationship to how much we're going to spend? i think this is lack. -- is lacking. i think if it was added it would change people's views about how difficult or how not so difficult these changes might be. other mandatory spending. the president talks about savings there on a base of $5.1 trillion. that's a savings of 4% in other mandatory accounts. things like ago gri culture -- things like agriculture where we have passed in the senate a farm bill that saves $23 billion. that is certainly something we could do. let's go to the next if we could. so already an act of savings from the budget criminal act and i hear all the time the senate hasn't passed a budget resolution for three years. instead of a budget resolution we passed a law called the budget control act. and that budget control act in many ways was much stronger than any resolution because as all of you kno
don't -- i think they-- it will be hard to go entirely to the middle because i think the electorate, the ones who did not vote for barack obama voted against this vision and voted against it very strongly and i think the republicans would put that at risk if they went too far to the middle. >> okay. when we come back, states have changed from kansas to michigan, to rhode island, reform is in the air. find out how some states are bucking the washington trend next. thanks to our explorer card. then, the united club. my motr was so wrong about you. next, we get priory boarding on our flight i booked with miles. all because of the card. and me. okay, what's the plan? plan? mm-hmm. we're on vacation. there is no plan. really? [ male announcer ] the united mileageplus explorer card. the mileage card with speci perks on united. get it and you're in. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the
already on it? first of all, when you attach it, just don't do a sync. but also if they own the songs with their itunes i.d., then you're out of luck. there are some other third party programs out there that will let you transfer them over for free. you just need to do a little google search for the program you want to use. i've done it and it works. >> gretchen: all right. clayton, thank you so much for all the answers to those questions and rick for our weather forecast. hopefully you have a safe flight today. and we will be following the fiscal cliff talks tomorrow. and clayton, you'll be hear, right? >> clayton: i will. so send us any of your questions as well and your thoughts. our -- go to our web site for the after the show show. >> gretchen: happy new year, everybody. gregg: fox news alert. powerful winter storm bringing deadly weather. >> oh, wow. that is a tornado. jesus, look at that tornado. it is like two tornados. it is two funnels on the frowned. oh, lord. look at there. wow! look at that. gregg: the storm system that produced those tornados in parts of the south not do
that don't live in new york, here is look at the tabloids this morning. the "new york post," off the fiscal cliff. this fall is really going to hurt. ben white of morning money, dennis, said an excuse to get a bic can keeney on the cover. >> relatively slow news day. what geithner did yesterday is almost as if he is strapping a damsel in distress to the tracks and saying the stakes are rising higher. the markets are taking all this tension, all this sort of -- these things at stake to really make the point perhaps that you have to have those stakes really high for people actually to get a deal. >> on "fast" last night when that letter crossed in the green rooms, we were chatting, we said this sounds like a ploy on the part of the treasury to actually get people to start moving. obviously, there wasn't a market selloff, did have the stumbling blocks and traders on friday said almost better if we did see the markets pull back more to crystallize what this could mean for the u.s. economy to members of congress. we didn't see that. it is a numbers game though in terms of what will happen. we kn
in the hospital for at least 48 hours? >> well, that depends on the answers to a lot of questions that we don't know. i am affiliated with columbia. i haven't spoken to any of the doctors who are taking care of the secretary. but here are some of the things that are running through my head. it's unusual for somebody who's had a blow to the head to get blood thinners. the reason is when somebody falls and hits their head you're worried about bleeding into the skull, into the brain, like natasha richardson had. so the last thing you would want to do is thin their blood. so trying to figure out what could have happened here. she had some sort of concussion two to three weeks ago she fell and hit her head. at that point i'm sure they did some kind of brain imaging, a c.a.t. scan for mri to the head. at that point she must have had no bleeding or so little they were able to observe her outside. in the last few days she had maybe symptoms or routine c.a.t. scan or routine mri, and they saw a clot. this clot would have to be inside the brain tissue in one of the blood vessels. it
that he had a year ago, that does not count. for republicans and people to say they don't understand what's going on, i have a problem with that. the republicans deny anything he puts forward. the president left his vacation and came here. they're not being fair. republicans say they are christians. they're not. they did this during his last term and now are causing and all of us to suffer because they don't like the president. this is personal. this has nothing to do with raising taxes. this is a personal attack and i think it's a shame. we look like a third world country. we don't look like the united states. host: let's get a republican voice. our next caller is calling from west bloomfield, michigan, on the republican line. good morning. caller: i would like to get your thoughts on a balanced approach and have unbiased taxation by using a flat tax. that way you can calculate the amount of taxes we need for the deficit over 10 years. another point is to control the spending on entitlements by not giving millionaires social security benefits, thereby satisfying president obama's approac
on a promise to finish intensivists if you can't get enough of politics will deal to go see it, although i don't know who that would be at this point. i'm sure we don't want to see the debate comes so we will finish on time for that. i'm here to talk about rachel carson and bismarck indicated that some of the 27th of december the 50th anniversary of silent spring. she was a famous author before she wrote "silent spring." i'm going to talk more about that tonight. this is rachel and i love this photograph. this is the frontispiece of the book. i spent seven months trying to find this photograph and arrange to reproduce it in the book. it was made by irving penn, the great 20th century portrait photographer verboten magazine and actually appeared in "vogue" magazine, although it took me several months to figure out exactly when and where.ccc any event committee was madecc in 1951, so it hasn't been seenc about six decades since the last photograph of rachel carson. by far the best photographs of her ever taken. she would've been 44 years old in this photograph and i just think it's terrific.
difference. and now the reverse as well. she's been in pakistan for three years. we don't know whether she speaks english, how much of her mother she remembers. >> her mother had appealed directly to pakistan for her help. >> the child's life that she deserves, that she should have. a life of not knowing who people are. she deserves to be loved. >> the police have now confirmed that they're on the flight from pakistan and will be her mother in manchester this evening. >> now, president obama's been calling together key congressional leaders to come up with a deal to avoid a budget crisis at the good old fiscal cliff and tell us how they're going to get out of this, or not. >> i wouldn't be sitting here if i knew. i think there are a great deal of overlapping of what is required. the prb is it's not enough overlap. this fiscal cliff was last in august of 2011. it has to do with the debt ceiling. it so happens the debt ceiling will be reached on december 31, or will it? because it appears the treasury said we found a bit of extra money so maybe we can keep things going a bit longer. and it w
. obviously foolhardy. there was no point to that, a man was going to die. they said don't do it, don't do it. the officer said send out the scout. it is an order. the man said don't send out the scout, don't let him go. they tried to hold the man back and he followed his orders and went across the field and he was shocked in the stomach. 30 seconds before the charge was supposed to take place the men got up, one of the men took his machine gun, he said let's get the bastard. a fixed bayonets and charged across the field and they yelled the rebel yell right out of the civil war. one of the rangers said it was one of the most glorious moments to be a ranger. as they charged across the field was the perfect time. the artillery was now falling on the germans rather than a sunken road. was the perfect window of opportunity and they seized the pillboxes and went up the hill. what happens next is unbelievable. with hardly any men they started out with roughly 120 men, they lost many men in the charge, lost men, ran up the hill, i have been to this place and toward it with a german veterans, ran up
cliff agreement reached we could see a gold play and if we don't see a fiscal cliff agreement reached, gold could see a buy. >> when you look at this income theme, which we think is still very important and for next year a secondary income theme, growing dividends, second commercial property, it has a lot of competition to do. we still own it. we've trimmed it. it's still a bit of a mixed message of gold. >> yeah. i think another role of gold is as an inflation hedge. and there i think the outlook is pretty negative, actually. because inflation is going to pick up and make gold a good investment. inflation, given all these weak economies in the world does not look likely to pick up. and that should reduce demand for gold. even the fiscal cliff, if the outcome of the fiscal cliff is a bit more austerity in the u.s., that should drive down inflation. >> we've seen a portfolio structure adding gold in that 12-year period. if you start to remove some of these buyers from the market such as a coutts, will the buying from central banks be enough to support the loss of that investor class? i
, and in the end, it required a lot of compromise and a lot of working together. those elements don't exist much today, and i hope somehow through all of this, whatever happens now in the next couple days, i hope somehow there's an understanding that you can't go on like this. it doesn't serve the country's interest to continue this kind of gridlock. we have to make decisions about the future. dagen: well, what will change it, though? what will change it? >> well, you know, what is happening at the moment is reenforcing in everybody's mind in this country that things are not working here. i hope everybody, republicans and democrats, the president, the congress understand we've got to show people we can work together. we can make compromises. you know, we have some new people in congress who made a promise back home, we won't compromise on anything, but stand by the principles and never compromise. unfortunately, things can't work that way. you must compromise. dagen: senator, great to see you, thank you so much. >> thank you very much. good to be with you. dagen: avoiding the cold in your home s
. they don't see it as a barrier. and, of course, the mythos of the dunkirk evacuation is all the little dots and the ferries, and this is true, they came out and they took soldiers back to england. it was about a 20-mile trip at its shortest. when it looked like the evacuation was going to start, churchill told the king, we'll be lucky if we get about 17,000 soldiers back. that's the way it looks. >> out of? >> about half a million, 500,000 french and british. instead of 17,000, they got about 340,000 men back to britain. a number of these were french and then went right back to france to help with the defense of other parts of france. but that's what called the miracle of dunkirk. they thought it was going to be much, much worse than it was. but they were lucky, they were lucky and some of the ways. >> your book bill focuses on june to october of 1940. >> yes. >> after the evacuation from dunkirk, what happened? does hitler attacked britain at that point? to the british fight back? what? >> the germans followed their plan, and maybe that was a mistake. at least one german general, and i thi
serious tax hikes and spending cuts that would potentially send the u.s. into another recession. we don't want to see that a. right now senate leaders are trying to assemble a last minute tax deal that they hope can pass both chambers of congress. and make it to the president's desk before monday's midnight deadline. chief congressional correspondent mike emmanuel has more on this. what are the latest on these talks to avoid a fiscal catastrophe? >> the key negotiators have been tight lipped, which may be a good sign talking to one another and not to reporters. senate majority leader harry reid and mitch mcconnell asked president obama and other congressional leaders to give them time to work on a compromise deal, recognizing time is running out. again today, the president emphasized the need for action. >> and congress can prehave not it from happening if they act now. leaders in congress are working on a way to prevent this tax hike on the middle class and i believe we may be able to reach an agreement that can pass both houses in time. >> we are told conversations are taking place. m
through the streets. everyone saying don't do it, mr. prime minister. bombs fall being. he would go there and get out of the car, talk to people in the street, the survivors, civilians. he was out there among them almost every day and most evenings. and they knew that. he would go to portsmouth around do the same thing. that was his genius. it was rash behavior, he had it do it. host: you said at one point that the lights were supposed to be off but he would smoke his cigar anyway. guest: he either was one occasion there were four of them in the car, coalville, a general, something else and the auto hraoeug auto lights were painted only the upper half and you were not supposed to use them at all if you didn't have to. and he came to a roadblock and the soldier said you there. host: tommy is what they called a british soldier? guest: yes. you in the car you can go no further. and from the car came go to hell, man. i'm thinking well, coleville was too general, the general was too polite. i think the fourth person feels -- was mr. bevan, the minister of labor, he was from the west cou
blinks? >> we don't have a sense. i'm sure that we will be getting a sense. this is supposed to take place at 3:00 p.m. at the white house. the vice president, president and four top congressional leaders. we don't know what will be said. i think we will likely hear from some camps afterwards. >> if you are wondering what a trip down the fiscal cliff might mean for your paycheck, for your 401(k), look no further than yesterday's dow. at the opening bell, a dive of more than 1%. investors finding little hope for the fiscal cliff compromise on capitol hill. when word came down two sides might be meeting. reversal of fortune. the dow rebounding for a while before finishing slightly lower. >>> a nation this morning remembering the american general credited with orchestrating one of the most lopsided military victories in military history. general norman schwarzkopf died yesterday in florida. he was 78 years old. and remembered by many from briefings like this one here, a media savvy general taking the lead in the first gulf war. the white house saying this about the general last night. o
in the sector. david: those idiots inside the beltway cannot seem to get it figured out. don't expect one anytime soon. lawmakers are gone for the holiday, so does the white house even want a deal by the new year, or automatic tax hikes what they want in order to balance their spending? more on that coming up, does the president really wants to go over the fiscal cliff? lori: cannot wait to hear where we stand, the latest negotiation or any at all on the cliff. spending specifically on toys. there is not a runaway must-have toy this year, but there are some hits and a few misses as well. what will be under the trees or what will be stuck on the retail shelves. david: but first, we will tell you what drove the market today with today's "data download." continued gridlock in the beltway sending stocks lower. the shorts in the day of trading. all three major indices closing the red with the dow closing the best losses, energy and utilities led the declines while materials and consumer discretionary outperform. natural gas a big mover in the energy pits falling more than 2% despite colder wea
. so there is a similarity with what is happening in europe and what could happen here if we don't get our house in order. >> you talked about a single- minded focus, yet you are leaving with jobs undone. how do you feel about leaving at this particular point in time? >> we still have several weeks. we have laid out the plans and all these efforts i have been part of and other efforts as well. i still have some optimism that we will get this job done. one of the reasons i did not run again is the really wanted to focus these last two years. i knew if i was running, i would not be able to be in the hundreds of hours of negotiations i have been in. i believe many of the ideas we have generated will be part of any solution, whether it comes before the end of this year or early next year. i believe the work product we have produced will be part of the solution. >> you talked about no longer missing a 80% of family birthdays. what will you be doing then? >> i will be doing some speaking and doing some teaching. i have people starting to talk to me about other opportunities. i can assure you
professors to say you are absolutely insane, don't you know anything about economics? actually, i do know a lot about economics. remember, though would -- the woodrow wilson school degree and a 20 years of reading between? the problem is, at least based on the last 10 years, it is the finance departments in the business schools that have the prestige and power. one of the unfortunate tendencies in business school curriculums is to allow shareholder value of ideology to prevail in most classes, and maybe there will be like one required class on business ethics or social responsibility, but create the notion that should be integrated to the business world, if we want our business world to thrive and we want to contribute to human welfare. >> right here, a question. >> i appreciate what you are saying. and the three solutions that i heard you offer -- is there anyone in public office that shares the same interest in what you are presenting that we can either contact or -- ? >> yes, peter bareez -- peter de vries of washington state and tom harkin in the senate. i have just come to our door t
to be a lame-duck member of congress? >> i don't feel lame at all. there is one item that it might be one of the mistakes i made in my life in public affairs. many years ago in southern california, when i was a member of the legislator, a fellow by the name of thomas was jailed for not being willing to give up his sources of information. i talked with my staff director in sacramento and said we must do something about this. it led to the first and only meeting i had with the board of the "los angeles times" which were discouraging me to go forward with a news man shield law. since then they have used in theiring aments in courts. today, i scratch my head especially when you look at the internet and say do we have to draw lines here? have we go too far? i personally think my position on a.c.a. is a good position and protecting the people's right to know is a high priority. >> what have you decided to do with all your papers and years in congress? >> that is an important question. i'm pleased to say that my alma mater at ucla is taking some interest. hopefully, some of that work will be of
in the office and they said, what ever you do, don't go in his office because he can be quite honoree. i could not wait to get in his office. the troopers day i went in and i saw he had all these posters of the metropolitan opera -- salome, la boeheme. i said, i am sort of an opera singer. >> where you hear? what are you doing here? anyhow, i worked for him for about six or seven months and then i got a call from another young arts program who said they got my name from pedro russell and they wanted to know i would come down and audition. i said, thank you, but i'm no longer your singing. days said they were just checking in because the name kept coming up. they call the third time. i was on the phone with a friend of mine and maybe a year had passed. i said, can you believe this? he said, you're crazy. every single would die to have an opera company called them. at that point, i had not sung in over one year and i had no idea what was going to come out. i told a woman on the phone, let me think about it and call you back. that night, i had a dream. i had a dream i had gone into the doctor's o
and he said thompson, don't do that. thompson said sir, you should not be out here, this is dangerous. churchill said i'm only doing there because i know you love to, which was completely untrue. thompson would rather be down in the shelter. he went after the typists all the time and made life more give for them as he was dictated he dictated all of his member most and addresses, he didn't like shorthand because it is a middle man. why take shorthand and type when he can save time and you type. unfortunately he would have the gr gra old tunes going and and turn under the volume and he would speak looking out the window and the typist is over there and can't hear him and when she would finish he would come over to the typewriter and put his hand on the white piece of paper and say gimme. that was the signal that he was done. very curt. host: when did he walk in front of his typist with nothing on? nude. he didn't dictate but he would come out of his bathroom. the fact that he could move the taps with his toes and he would be splashing in his bath and the typist with be ready across the
provision which was even more targeted toward low enand middle income working families. i don't think anybody would dispute that it needs to expire, the question is whether that time is now or whether it should go on a little bit longer. that's a debate that we could have but i will point out it doesn't seem to be a part of the current debate and very likely it won't be. host: joseph rosenberg is with us for charitable giving. back to the phones. jack in allenson, michigan, on our line for independents. go ahead, jack. caller: i want to ask mr. rosenberg if he has ever heard of lincoln electric in cleveland, ohio. host: and why did he wanted to know that? caller: well, they wrote a book, james f. lincoln wrote a book, a new approach to industrial economics where they have no unions. everybody is responsible for their own work. they do peace work. everybody's responsible. everybody has a lifetime job. they get huge pieces of the pie. and ownership is -- the people, the workers, everybody owns the piece of the pie. host: what does this have to do with the fiscal cliff? caller: well, if
villain such as mussolini, stalin and hitler. i don't think joe biden could laugh at them into. and while we have some sidebar sections, one my favorite is a comparison and contrast between the world's three leading architects of the day, frank lloyd wright and tony gaudi, and walter, who it into my nature, god and man, in that order. or robert perry during race for the north pole. the bulk of this book is dedicated to those political forces that reshaped this entry. as one who gravitates towards the great man theory in most of my history, i was almost at a loss for words last week at a book signing event when a questioner asked me who's the most important person in your book? dawned on me, this really isn't a book about most important people. it's a book about great ideas, and terrible ideas, ideas that in the course of the century were tested in the most climactic of ways, war. but the most important of the ideas that we discuss is something many writers and intellectuals provided lipservice to, american exceptionalism, but which no one has really defined. we are kind of surprise as we
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